Here is how you can protect yourself from Spousal Spying

After you file for a divorce or when your marriage is on the verge of ending, there may be a lot of trust issues between you and your spouse. They could be interested in your private dealings and communications as they strive to catch you pants down doing something they could use against you in your divorce proceedings or in a planned lawsuit against you. While their insecurities may be justified, there is a chance they will be violating your rights or even breaking state and federal laws in the process.

Spying, whether justified or not, can be nasty when you are on the receiving end. There are things you wish to keep private and your bitter spouse is the last person you want knowing about them. So, what do you do to protect yourself from prying eyes of your spouse?

Firstly, you need to understand that a fine line sits between what’s legal and what’s not when it comes to spying. Your spouse could be well acquainted with all laws related to spying and could be treading the road rather cautiously. When dealing with such a smart person, you may need one of the attorneys at Modern Law to help you confront the spouse and protect you from privacy invasion.

Ways through which your spouse could be spying on you

  • Installing a GPS tracking device on your vehicle
  • Seeking information from your coworkers, friends, relatives, and lovers without your knowledge
  • Getting someone to physically track your movements
  • Reading your text messages, mail, and emails without your knowledge either by obtaining your passwords, using spy applications, or hacking into your gadgets.
  • Using fake profiles on social media to connect with you and try to convince you to reveal sensitive information to them
  • Listening to your conversations or even placing audio recorders in your house without your knowledge
  • Installing surveillance cameras in your house or car

There are several ways someone could spy on you without even physically getting close to you. Don’t wait for hard evidence that you are being spied on to take action. Any slight clue should be taken with immense seriousness.

As stated above, the first thing to do is get a lawyer and tell them everything you have observed and why you think they point towards your partner spying on you. The lawyer will likely try to find proof of the allegations before confronting your spouse. If the spouse admits they are illegally spying on you, warn them that you will take legal action if they continue doing it. Be sure, however, to keep the evidence for when push comes to shove.

For good measure, consider checking your house and car for hidden cameras and GPS trackers; changing your phone passwords; checking all your gadgets for spy software; and, if possible, installing anti-spyware software in your phone and computer. If your spouse doesn’t slow down and you believe they are taking it too far, consider calling the police or seeking a protection order from the court.